Best MA (or Equivalent) Thesis or Major Research Paper in Canadian Studies (2019)

Description: This prize is awarded to an outstanding interdisciplinary MA thesis (or equivalent) or major research paper (MRP) completed at a Canadian university on a Canadian subject that best advances our knowledge and understanding of Canada and Canadian Studies. (Major research papers are expected to be 40 to 60 pages in length and will normally be modelled along the lines of a scholarly journal article.)

Award: The winner will receive a $150 prize and a one-year membership in the CSN.

Nomination: The graduate program must be an institutional member in good standing with the CSN in order to submit a thesis or major research paper for consideration. Directors or chairs of graduate Canadian Studies Programs or Centres at Canadian universities can submit only one thesis or major research paper for consideration each year. The thesis or major research paper must be submitted to the Canadian Studies Network-Réseau d'études canadiennes no later than 30 June. Nominations must be sent to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Eligibility: The thesis or major research paper must have been defended in the calendar year preceding the nomination. The director or chair of a Canadian Studies Program or Centre submitting the thesis or major research paper must include the following:

1. An electronic copy of the thesis or major research paper

2. A two-page abstract of the thesis or major research paper written by the author of the thesis or major research paper

3. A copy of the curriculum vitae of the author of the thesis or major research paper

4. A letter of nomination from the director or chair of a Canadian Studies Program or Centre, or from the supervisor of the thesis or major research paper.

Selection: A three-member interdisciplinary panel drawn from the CSN Executive Members and its Advisory Council will select the winner. This selection committee will be looking at theses or major research papers that transcend disciplinary boundaries and demonstrate innovation in thought and-or methodology. The selection panel reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year. The winner will normally be announced by the CSN in September. There will be no appeals of the panel's decision.

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Previous winners of this prize

Kristan Newell, Redefining the Acadian French Lexicon: The Role of English Loanwords in Two Acadian Villages

Maddie Macnab, Making home and making welcome: An oral history of the New Canadians Centre and immigration to Peterborough, Ontario from 1979 to 1997

James Rhatigan, Afterlife of a Mine: The Tangled Legacies of the Britannia Mine

Conor Falvey, Foregrounds: Mapping Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual History in Fredericton, 1969-1992

John Laman, Revisiting the Sanctuary City: Citizenship or Abjection? Spotlighting the Case of Toronto